Frequently Asked Questions

How does a community garden work?

Most DUG community gardens are comprised of many separate garden plots that are cared for by individuals or families. Community gardeners care for and harvest from their own plot. Shared spaces like pathways, perennial herb and flower beds, sheds, and gathering spaces are cared for by all members of a community garden. The day to day operations of the garden, including new gardener sign-ups and organization of community work days and potlucks, are handled by volunteer garden leaders or steering committees. For additional information about Denver Urban Gardens’ community gardens, visit their website at www.dug.org.

I have not gardened before, can I participate? How will I learn to garden?

New to gardening? Those with little or no experience gardening are a great fit for our study. Once you receive a garden, you will be offered a free gardening class, and an opportunity to meet with a master community gardener to answer any questions. The CAPS team is also available to support gardeners with questions they may have.

How much am I expected to garden every week?

There is no minimum or maximum amount of gardening time required, and the garden is accessible every day of the week at your convenience.

How long are health visits and where do they take place?

The health visits take 1-1.5 hours and primarily take place at the Posner Center for International Development, in the DUG office, in RINO. The address is 1031 33rd St Denver, CO 80205 .

Can I schedule a health visit for an evening or weekend?

Yes! Our team makes every effort to schedule health visits around your life’s schedule. We are available to do health visits most days, starting as early as 8 a.m., and as late as 7 p.m.

How does the activity monitor work?

The ActivPal activity monitor is worn for one week after each health visit. It is attached to the thigh with Tegaderm, a transparent medical dressing, and can be worn during nearly all activities, including showering. Please see our ActivPal page for more information.

Who am I growing the food for?

All the food that you grow is for you to keep! Many gardens do donate extra produce to food banks, shelters, and their neighbors, but it is up to you to decide what you would like to do with anything you plant and grow.